My Colleague is Taking Credit for My Work

My Colleague is Taking Credit for My Work You have put a lot of sweat equity into a new, and even innovative, product for a very large children’s toy manufacturer. It fills a niche for pre-kindergarten in your company’s line. The game doesn’t require as much manual dexterity as those for older children but is more challenging mentally then the regular pre-kindergarten stuff. You can see that it would give bragging rights to parents and this could be a great selling feature. You’ve felt that there has been real team work with Wesley, who is a more senior designer in the unit. He is not your supervisor but he’s been a big help, throwing around ideas. You two are ready to present the prototype to your management. The presentation meeting Manager: So Wesley and Nick want to give us an update on the smart pre-kindergarten game. Who’s gonna start?     You and Wesley look at each other. Before You can say anything: Wesley: Why don’t I? I’m really happy with the progress on what I’m thinking of calling the Baby Einstein game. This is news to you! Manager: Hey, I like that. Taps into the whole bragging rights for…