My Boss is Disrespectful
Employee Stream , Power for Employees / November 13, 2017

My Boss is Disrespectful In the last post, I outlined ways bosses can be jerks. This post will focus on those who are disrespectful. What it is I think this boss doesn’t get that treating his employees as human beings is not just good business (as it is), but a requirement of humanness. Instead he: Is always late for meetings Doesn’t read the work you did for the meeting Sends e-mails and texts all hours of the night (and expects a prompt response) Changes his mind frequently and is unconcerned about the extra work caused Reprimands or corrects employees in public, sometimes loudly or even abusively Never, never says thank you What it looks like Your boss, Tony, has called you into his office. Tony: Didn’t you get my text? You: Yeah, I just read it. Tony: I sent it yesterday.   I need you to hop to it. You: But you sent it after midnight. Tony: So? I’m still working even if you aren’t. You: Okay—I’ll get on it. What to do You want to yell, Just because you don’t have a personal life, doesn’t mean I don’t. Are you crazy? I get it. But not the most effective…

My Boss is a Jerk
Employee Stream , Power for Employees / November 6, 2017

My Boss is a Jerk If the world were fair, you’d only have to work for bosses who are even handed and encourage their staff to their full potential, and are not working out any personal issues on the job. Right. Every once in a while, you get a great one. And if you do, they are gold. Hang in there as long as you can and don’t take your luck for granted. They’re not all jerks But for the rest of us, perfect bosses, like perfect people, are few and far between. Which doesn’t mean the rest are jerks, of course. After all, you’re not perfect either (I hope this is not news to you) and would probably not do a better job than your boss. Even if you’re sure that you would. So, generally, I’d give your boss the benefit of the doubt, if you can. Flawed, yes. Sometimes a little petty. Or inconsiderate. Or bad-tempered. If these are not characteristics but occasional outbreaks, I’d try to treat them as one-offs and focus on whether your boss is primarily a good guy with positive intent. But sometimes you can’t because your boss’ behavior makes it difficult to do…

Are You Being Taken for Granted on the Job?

Are You Being Taken for Granted on the Job? In previous posts, you actually had it good when your boss valued you too much to let you go. You get the same outcome but none of the kudos if it is taken for granted you will do your job well. Some jobs are easier to take for granted. Examples might be the background organization of a big meeting or convention, production of a regular report, or delivery of a well-established program. Here, obviously, fighting fires is considered failure. Other jobs seem to consist largely of putting out fires. People in them are more likely to be hailed as company heroes but frankly, even a job like that can fall into this category if the incumbent tries hard enough. How do you know if you’re being taken for granted? It’s mostly a feeling but here are some cues: A proposal impacts your area but nobody consults on whether it will cause you glitches. Your work problems are considered trivial (e.g. the sound system isn’t up to the size of the room). Your evaluations emphasize “does a good job; delivers what is required” and not “exciting new project successfully delivered” or “huge…

Talking to Your Boss about Being Trapped in a Job

Talking to Your Boss about Being Trapped in a Job We’ve discussed when being too competent at your job can impede your career. This can occur when your boss has a dog-in-the-manger view of good staff; he wants to keep them even if they don’t want to be kept. Whether to talk to your boss It’s an option. With some real benefits. If he truly didn’t realize you were unhappy, you two could discuss a path which suits you both. However, and this is a big however, your boss may know what he’s doing and will respond defensively when it is raised. Look at your boss in other situations. When things go wrong, does he look for a scapegoat? In meetings, does he let others talk or lay down the law? Do you know to watch your ps and qs with him to avoid offending? Things like this should make you think twice. Let your gut be your guide. The conversation You’ve decided that, for all his bluster, your boss is a good enough guy you think he’ll listen. I’ll run through a possible conversation, with commentary on the side. Pick a good time—end of day can be YOU: Ben, got…

Avoid the Dangers of Being Too Expert at Your Job

Avoid the Dangers of Being Too Expert at Your Job The answer is not, of course, to start being bad at your job. That really is cutting your nose off to spite your face. And I am assuming you are keeping your eye on the job ads. While you are doing that, there are other options to try to address the problem of being too expert to be promoted. Talk to your boss? This is where the assessment of jerkiness comes in. If you can see that your boss is demanding but fair; if he doesn`t suffer fools gladly but gives praise when merited; if he yells in anger but also in excitement—this might be a boss you can talk to. However, if he is kind of mean-spirited or petty or if he is a follow-the-rules-no-matter-what type, you might not want to. It`s a judgment call. If you`re doubtful, I would tend not to. Because I want to cover the other two points, I will do a separate post on how to have the discussion with your boss on this if you think it might be productive. Train others to be expert You probably get a lot of recognition from how…