Challenging Fighting Words Challenging Tod In the last post, you had an ugly meeting. Tod from Finance tried to grab the whole contracting process and went ballistic when people objected. You’ve had an idea you think would work. But the way things are going, it’s likely to be tough to get the idea heard. What can you do to get your idea heard? If you try to table it over Tod’s singlemindedness, it’s likely to descend into another shouting...

Fighting Words Fighting words to streamline a process Your boss has chosen you to represent Customer Relations in a cross-departmental group to streamline a process. Things have come to a head because your biggest customer is threatening to use a competitor if your company can’t fix the slow process. You expect some fighting to get it done. The first meeting Tod (Finance): The solution is clear. Finance taking the lead will speed things up a wh...

Fake It Until You Make It: Benefiting from Being In So you’re in the in-group. You’re invited to the TGIFs and the bull session isn’t complete without you. Congratulations. However, a seat at the table is not enough. If all you do is laugh at their jokes and nod vigorously, you’ll gradually but surely slip out of the in-group. To stay in, you need a presence. How? This post will discuss what you need and how you should fake it until you f...

Is It Worth Being In the Gang? It’s a lot of work to manage your position in the group. And sometimes sacrifice. So do you even want to be in the gang? The answer is usually yes Generally speaking, the in-crowd gets the most perks, the best assignments, the most forgiveness for screw-ups. There are more chances to strut your stuff and line up the next promotion. So, lots of good career reasons why it’s better to be in. But that isn’t always...

Getting into the In-group Clique Okay, you’ve decided that you want into the in-group clique. How? Working hard? Taking one for the team? If the world were fair, that would do it. But plenty of hard-working, dedicated, and decent guys are thanked for their contribution but never invited in. Hard work is a given. In-groupedness seems something else. First, don’t make it obvious Don’t look desperate to get in. Remember the cartoon with a big ...

Getting Harmony and Teamness Right

Your group didn’t get a report in on time and you need to figure out why. You want to challenge the assumption that the most important thing is getting along or teamness.Raising the issue with Megan and Jean won’t be an easy conversation but it’s necessary. YOU: So, guys, I wanted to talk about the report not going out last week. Expect avoidance Jean: But it went the Tuesday after so no harm done. YOU:  I’d like to discuss why...

Harmony Gone Wrong

Harmony Gone Wrong What happened? In the last post, you returned after a week off to find that an important report didn’t go out. You thought you could have counted on Megan. You need to talk to her. Talk to Megan After discussions about the state of your father’s health, you get down to brass tacks. You Skype her. YOU: I was disappointed the report wasn’t finished on time. Megan: I sent you what I could. I didn’t have all the d...

Getting Along Can Do You In- Team Spirit Gone Wrong

Getting Along Can Do You In Team Spirit Gone Wrong The need for harmony Having a harmonious working life is a good thing, as is a harmonious personal life. It is stressful, unpleasant, and even injurious to your health to work in tension or conflict. A team which gets along is usually more productive. However, the need for harmony can sometimes be so overwhelming that everything else goes out the window—such as being innovative, avoid...

The Requirement to Lie

  The Requirement to Lie There is some topsy-turvyness about lying and work. As I’ve said previously, the benefits of the lie are not to be sneezed at. If you balance the seriousness of the lie and the possible downsides of the truth, I’m not surprised if you might opt for the lie. In this post, I’m not talking about whether you should lie but how it affects your career prospects. You’re golden if you do In the previous situati...

I Sent the Truth

    I Sent the Truth In the last post, you sent in a progress report projecting a six-week overrun rather than the three months likely. But you may have set yourself up as the fall guy. Another option you had originally was to send the real report with the three month problem. What would have happened if you sent the original report to your boss, not the altered one? Your team will probably be pleased. “Now those guys will get that ...