My Boss is Disrespectful
Employee Stream , Power for Employees / November 13, 2017

My Boss is Disrespectful In the last post, I outlined ways bosses can be jerks. This post will focus on those who are disrespectful. What it is I think this boss doesn’t get that treating his employees as human beings is not just good business (as it is), but a requirement of humanness. Instead he: Is always late for meetings Doesn’t read the work you did for the meeting Sends e-mails and texts all hours of the night (and expects a prompt response) Changes his mind frequently and is unconcerned about the extra work caused Reprimands or corrects employees in public, sometimes loudly or even abusively Never, never says thank you What it looks like Your boss, Tony, has called you into his office. Tony: Didn’t you get my text? You: Yeah, I just read it. Tony: I sent it yesterday.   I need you to hop to it. You: But you sent it after midnight. Tony: So? I’m still working even if you aren’t. You: Okay—I’ll get on it. What to do You want to yell, Just because you don’t have a personal life, doesn’t mean I don’t. Are you crazy? I get it. But not the most effective…

My Boss is a Jerk
Employee Stream , Power for Employees / November 6, 2017

My Boss is a Jerk If the world were fair, you’d only have to work for bosses who are even handed and encourage their staff to their full potential, and are not working out any personal issues on the job. Right. Every once in a while, you get a great one. And if you do, they are gold. Hang in there as long as you can and don’t take your luck for granted. They’re not all jerks But for the rest of us, perfect bosses, like perfect people, are few and far between. Which doesn’t mean the rest are jerks, of course. After all, you’re not perfect either (I hope this is not news to you) and would probably not do a better job than your boss. Even if you’re sure that you would. So, generally, I’d give your boss the benefit of the doubt, if you can. Flawed, yes. Sometimes a little petty. Or inconsiderate. Or bad-tempered. If these are not characteristics but occasional outbreaks, I’d try to treat them as one-offs and focus on whether your boss is primarily a good guy with positive intent. But sometimes you can’t because your boss’ behavior makes it difficult to do…

Conflicting Orders—Refuse the Project
Employee Stream , Power for Employees / September 11, 2017

Conflicting Orders—Refuse the Project In the last post, you asked your boss Sean’s permission to go ahead with a cross-silo project. He was either angry or gave you a chance. Problem is you don’t know which one it will be before the fact. Wouldn’t it be best to avoid undertaking the project completely, given you know that Sean is lukewarm to the idea? What kind of risk are you taking? You presumably know Sean to some extent. You’ve seen his reaction in other situations. Does he fly off the handle when things don’t go his way, or stay calm? Does he allow push-back on his orders, or do you know not to question him? These and other indicators can give you some predictive power on his reaction to broaching the cross-silo project. Pay attention. Should you assume the worst? If, after this assessment, you’re pretty sure that he’ll go ballistic, you’d be wise to keep your head down. But what if the risk doesn’t seem so extreme? What if he might go for it? In this case, I’d encourage asking, not just for the sake of the project. Being afraid to even raise an issue can lead to an unhealthy…

Conflicting Orders—Ask Your Boss
Power for Employees / September 4, 2017

Conflicting Orders—Ask Your Boss Your CEO (Danvers) gave a rousing speech about breaking down silos. In the last post, you and your buddy Ethan from another section decided to go ahead with a cross-silo project. Your boss (Sean) did not react well. Given this, should you have asked him first even though you think he would have said no? Let’s see what happens. If your boss is kind of a shit Sean: What did I tell you after the staff meeting? You: You said to keep working— Sean: Exactly—just work on the projects I assign you. You: But what about the CEO— Sean: (makes a disgusted noise) These mucky-mucks don’t know what they’re talking about. The trick is to keep your head down until they go haring off after another great idea. You: But if she really wants to change things— Sean: I’ll tell you if you need to change anything. You: Ah, okay. So you’ve asked and as you’ve feared, Sean has vetoed the idea without even giving you a chance to explain. You’re discouraged and Sean is probably pissed off that you questioned his original order. If your boss is kind of a good guy Sean: What did…

Conflicting Orders—Follow the Big Boss
Employee Stream , Power for Employees / August 27, 2017

Conflicting Orders—Follow the Big Boss In the last post, you went to an inspiring all-staff meeting where the CEO, Ms. Danvers, encouraged everyone to work across silos to create greater team work. You think it’s a great idea although your boss Sean seems neutral. But your buddy Ethan from another unit (silo) of the company is also enthusiastic and suggests you work together on a great new app. You really believe in the CEO’s message so you agree to start work on the project. For the next couple of weeks, you work hard on it and you’re getting excited about its potential. It’s taken more time than anticipated but you figure with one last push, you’ll at least have a demo. You can imagine the CEO using your work and Ethan’s as an example of cross-silo teamwork . However, at the beginning of the third week, Sean leans over your cubicle wall. Sean: Hey, Ange, I was expecting the Houston redesign on Friday. What’s up? You: Oh, sorry, Sean, it’s taking longer than expected. I should have it to you by the end of the week. Sean: But what about the Kowallski project for this week? It’s due by Friday,…